15' 0" Hiawatha

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Arctic
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Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 12:06 pm
Location: Harrietsville, Ontario
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Post by Arctic » Thu Nov 17, 2005 9:28 pm

Well things have changed around my house. I am on parental leave until April- my wife just started back to work this week- so that means more time with the little one and less time on the boat. (I like the boat, but I love the little one!)
I have managed to smooth and fair my hull with a spokeshave and medium grit sandpaper- and have begun to gap fill with epoxy. My biggest gaps are on the bottom at the centre line- and other than a few damaged coves there are no other gaps that light shines through when I do a light test from the inside. Nothing the epoxy won't take care of.
Gap filling is not the most attractive stage- with the hull looking all patchy until the epoxy cures and can be sanded away- but I can see what an important step this will be- especially for the fiberglassing stage. I got about 1/4 done tonight- about an hours work (more going it over it several times with the halogen light than anything else). Put a picture on the site, patches and all!

http://photobucket.com/albums/b265/arctic971/

Once I am done the gap filling with sand away the excess epoxy- sand the hull one more time with fine grit (150) sandpaper and rais the grain- then for the next big step- fiberglassing- but I don't want to get ahead of myself yet.


Mark,
Cantley, Quebec.
"The journey is the reward"- Tao saying

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Patricks Dad
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Post by Patricks Dad » Thu Nov 17, 2005 11:48 pm

Mark, One approach to filling gaps is to mask off the area around the gap and then fill the gap with epoxy thickened with wood flour to the right color. Before the epoxy sets up, peel off the masking tape leaving a narrow strip of epoxy in the gap. This avoids getting epoxy on the rest of the hull around the gap. After the epoxy sets, you can use a cabinet scraper to clean up the epoxy in the gap. This approach avoids any chance of the epoxy soaking into the surrounding wood making a visible mark when the fiberglassing is done (due to different rates of absorption of the epoxy into the hull - not sure if this is really a concern or not but we didn't want to worry about that potential problem).

Keep up the good work (I'd think that being on leave, that little one needs to take a nap now and then and that might afford you some time to make some progress on the canoe!)
Enjoy both!
Randy Pfeifer
(847) 341-0618
Randy.Pfeifer1@gmail.com

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Arctic
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Location: Harrietsville, Ontario
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Post by Arctic » Fri Nov 18, 2005 8:50 am

Thanks for the advice PD. Good idea- I was planning to sand the excess patches away- using tape will save a lot of that!
It's the little things like that I wish I thought of!
Is there any concern about the tape getting stuck to the hull with epoxy? Would the epoxy penetrate the tape?
I already have the baby monitor on the workbench for those nap times

Mark
Cantley, Quebec
"The journey is the reward"- Tao saying

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KARKAUAI
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Location: Hickory, NC / Princeville, Kauai, HI
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Post by KARKAUAI » Fri Nov 18, 2005 5:10 pm

No worry about the tape sticking. Use blue painter's masking tape, pull it off before the epoxy sets up too hard, but after it's done sagging or oozing. Scrape as Randy described when it's still rubbery and it'll be easier. If a little of the tape gets stuck under some epoxy, it will scrape right off, too.
A hui ho,
Kent

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Arctic
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Post by Arctic » Mon Nov 21, 2005 8:58 pm

Well the shop has the pleasant smell of red cedar in the air- it should after all that sanding I did this week. Between diaper changes and bottles (and during naps), I managed to sand the hull- gap fill (the painters tape worked great for the last 3/4 of gap filling on the hull) smooth and sand again and finally raise the grain.
Raising the grain was nice- got a good preview of the colour the hull will be once it is glassed and epoxied- all I can say is it was striking. Took a few photos and they are now on the website.
Next I will study the book, the forum postings and scour the net about epoxy/fiberglassing. Once I have studied and recruited a helper (haven't had one yet) I will make plans to do the glass job. Will probably have a few questions before that though!

http://photobucket.com/albums/b265/arctic971/

Mark,
Cantley, Quebec.
"The journey is the reward"- Tao saying

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KARKAUAI
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Post by KARKAUAI » Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:45 am

Aloha, Mark,
She's looking great!
If you aren't comfortable with the glassing process after doing your research, consider getting the glassing video from Newfound Woodworks. It'll give you a good idea of what it's actually like to do the process and willgive you the confidence to dive in.
http://www.newfound.com/books&videos.htm
A hui ho,
Kent

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Arctic
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Location: Harrietsville, Ontario
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Post by Arctic » Wed Dec 14, 2005 10:20 am

Just a quick update on my progress. Its been a while.
I have been mainly doing research on the epoxy process. This being a one time shot deal I want to get it right. Besides reading Canoecraft and consulting the forum, I ordered Bear Mountains new Kayak Craft DVD- "A visual Manual" specifically for the part on the epoxy process. It is the same system (West system) I am using.
I must say it was well worth the $20 I spent. The DVD has excellent visuals of the process and is complimented by Ted Moore's commentary. I think I will watch it a few more times! I also think I will order a copy of Kayak Craft as well and start thinking about a project for next winter!
I have been pretty busy on the home front as well, with the Christmas season being upon us. As a result I just haven't had as much time as I used to to work on the boat- but I am hoping to have the epoxy process (outside of the hull) done early in the new year. Will keep you updated and post pics as things slowly move along.
Thanks for all the advice and help up till now, and a Merry Christmas and New Year to all you fellow builders. Hope Sanata is good to you all.

Mark
Cantley, Quebec.
"The journey is the reward"- Tao saying

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Arctic
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Post by Arctic » Sun Dec 18, 2005 9:55 am

Well, due to a snow storm here on Friday I had some plans for the weekend cancelled and found myself with time. Friday night the shop was set up and ready to go for epoxy/fiberglassing first thing Saturday morning. I was up abut 6:45 and working by 7:30.
The first coat went fairly smooth- I worked fast and agressively- after about 3.5 hours the fiberglass was saturated and squegeed. I had some shiny spots and was concerned the cloth might be floating- but things seem to have been OK.
After about 6 hours of curing I laid on the 2nd coat to fill the weave. This time instead of using a brush I used a high density foam roller. Things went on smooth and fast and I was done the second coat in about 1 hour. After that it was time for bed- a long and tiring day.
The morning showed a much shinier hull- still can see the weave at certain angles in the light - but I think that is normal at this stage. I have one more coat to go to bury the cloth- and will likley do that in the next few weeks, depending on how busy my wife keeps me with Christmas and family.
The process was messy, long and tiring- but in the end the results were very rewarding and most importantly I'm having fun!
New photos on the photo site at:

http://photobucket.com/albums/b265/arctic971/

Mark,
Cantley, Quebec.
"The journey is the reward"- Tao saying

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KARKAUAI
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Post by KARKAUAI » Sun Dec 18, 2005 8:19 pm

Nice to have that first glassing experience behind you, huh. Sounds like everything went to your satisfaction...whew!!! Actually, that becomes one of the fun parts once the angst is over with, Now you're back to sanding. Remember that sanding epoxy puts a lot of toxic dust in the air, hope you've got a good mask.
A hui ho,
Kent

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Patricks Dad
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Location: Warrenville, Illinois

Post by Patricks Dad » Sun Dec 18, 2005 8:58 pm

Congratulations on getting past a critical step! Patrick and I put 4 coats (West 105/207) on our Redbird in 1 (long) day. We started around 7AM and finished around 1 or 2AM the next morning. Your experience with rollers for the 2nd coat sounds very good (1 hour for the whole thing is very quick). We used brushes and squeegee and the 2nd coat took nearly as long as the first.

How will you be able to stand not getting that 3rd coat on for a couple weeks? I'd go (more) nuts!
Randy Pfeifer
(847) 341-0618
Randy.Pfeifer1@gmail.com

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Arctic
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Location: Harrietsville, Ontario
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Post by Arctic » Sat Jan 14, 2006 3:22 pm

This morning (after making a batch of muffins with my wife and daughter) I headed out to the shop- lightly sanded the hull and applied the third coat of epoxy. This was the first time I had enough time to do it. I am glad to now have it done!
Everything went well- applied the epoxy rather thick for this one with the brush and squegee. It is curing now. Took me about 2 hours in all to get this last coat on-I was pleased in the end.
I used a "bunny suit" and gas mask/respirator for protection - made things much more comfortable- no signs of epoxy sensitivity, no runny nose this time.
Will put some updated pics on the photo site soon.
Next- more sanding and getting ready to turn her over- I am looking forward to that- a whole new prespective!
Here are some recent photos:

http://photobucket.com/albums/b265/arctic971/


Now to those muffins!

Mark,
Cantley, Quebec.
"The journey is the reward"- Tao saying

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Arctic
Posts: 217
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 12:06 pm
Location: Harrietsville, Ontario
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Post by Arctic » Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:22 pm

Well, I have decided to let the last coat of epoxy come to a full 2 week cure before attempting to sand it- not wanting to lose two weeks time waiting fro it to dry I decided to turn the boat over and get started on the inside.
After unscrewing the stem and # 6 molds- my wife and I were able to lift her off the strongback and on to the (rather crude- but functional) cradles I made.
Now to tackle the inside!

Here are some photo's of her turned over.

http://photobucket.com/albums/b265/arctic971/

Mark,
Cantley, Quebec.
"The journey is the reward"- Tao saying

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Glen Smith
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Location: Baie-St-Paul, Quebec, Canada

Post by Glen Smith » Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:26 pm

The boat looks good, Mark. You might find it hard on the back to work on the interior with the cradles that low though. I know I found it painful and I ended up making new vertical members so it would be a few inches higher. Of course it was also more wobbly! :laughing

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Patricks Dad
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Post by Patricks Dad » Tue Jan 17, 2006 10:50 pm

Mark, One suggestion for you. Now that the strongback is just sitting there, remove the forms, find the scraps from cutting out the forms in the first place (a long time ago) or cut some new "form negatives" and use a couple of them (say station 4) turned upright to make supports for the canoe. You can cover the scraps with something soft (like a couple layers of carpet or carpet padding). Mount them to the same blocks you mounted the station forms to. You will need to mount them out further to compensate for the extra material you now have but the shape should be very close. Now you can continue working away on the inside.

We found that the height was just about right for us (and we didn't have to build separate stands and it put those scraps to good use).

Just a thought.
Randy Pfeifer
(847) 341-0618
Randy.Pfeifer1@gmail.com

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Glen Smith
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Post by Glen Smith » Tue Jan 17, 2006 11:00 pm

Randy is right, I should have mentionned that. I started using that method when building kayaks. I use foam pipe insulation for the padding.

Image

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