16'-6" Hipawa

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digger
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:33 pm

16'-6" Hipawa

Post by digger » Mon Aug 11, 2014 5:40 pm

I just responded to an ad for plans and molds for a Hipawa canoe. Before committing I was hoping to get some feedback as to this model. I'm basically a high mountain lake paddler. Just quick day trips.

Thanks,

Blair

KenC
Posts: 190
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2004 10:42 pm
Location: Oakville, ON

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by KenC » Mon Aug 11, 2014 9:46 pm

Do you perhaps mean the Kipawa, by John Winters? I have the plans for that one, but haven't built it yet.

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Cruiser
Posts: 621
Joined: Sat Apr 27, 2013 10:21 am
Location: Bowmanville, Ontario

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by Cruiser » Tue Aug 12, 2014 7:10 pm

If it is a Kipawa, I am building one currently, that is favorite tandem. Can't wait to see how the commercial versions compare with a stripper.

digger
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:33 pm

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by digger » Wed Aug 13, 2014 9:35 am

Sorry, yes, it is the Kipawa. Sounds like this is a popular model. Visually, I prefer the models with more curve to the bow and stern lines. I guess this is the rocker? Anyways for the offered price of $150 for molds, it may be a decent investment.

Phantom Power
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Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:07 pm
Location: Gulf Islands, BC

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by Phantom Power » Wed Aug 13, 2014 8:21 pm

Rocker is curve below the water line.

The height and shape of the ends of the canoe above the water line is called the stems recurve. A boat like the Redbird has high stems with lots of recurve, whereas the Freedom and most modern asymetrical designs have low stems with no recurve.

digger
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:33 pm

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by digger » Thu Aug 14, 2014 1:23 pm

Thanks for the clarification. Hadn't heard those terms before. Using that language, the Kipawa seems to have very little stem recurve and doesn't appeal to me. Guess I'll pass on the offer.

Thanks all.
By the way, I'm in the middle of building the Resolute kayak. Getting ready to start the deck next week.

KenC
Posts: 190
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2004 10:42 pm
Location: Oakville, ON

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by KenC » Tue Aug 19, 2014 9:09 pm

...building the Resolute kayak. Getting ready to start the deck next week.
That's a milestone. You going strictly by the plans, or are you making any modifications? I deviated some on my Endeavour deck.

digger
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:33 pm

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by digger » Wed Aug 20, 2014 2:09 pm

I want to get creative with the king strip. Not sure how wide I can make it and still follow the ridge on the molds. The deck will be my first stab at going stapleless. I'm also studying the joint between the coverboards and the king strip to see if I can do something unusual.

Still planning ahead on the coaming area. Seems like lots of variations on the size/shape/construction methods. Love to hear anyone's ideas on the above thoughts.

Blair

KenC
Posts: 190
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2004 10:42 pm
Location: Oakville, ON

Re: 16'-6" Hipawa

Post by KenC » Fri Sep 19, 2014 9:35 am

Kingstrip? Coverboards? I used KayakCraft as my primary guide, but I have no memory of that terminology. Must be an age thing. No matter.

How far along are you with the deck? For the deck of my Endeavour, I went with planed edges instead of bead & cove. The curvature on the deck is pretty mild, so it turned out to be pretty simple. If you plan to do any fancy swooping strip patterns on your deck, planed edges will make the fitting easier.

As far as the coaming goes, it depends on how you intend to use the kayak, but in any event, I highly recommend deviating from the plans a bit. I made several modifications:
  • 1. I lowered the height of the rear deck by varying amounts, starting with a 5/8" reduction just behind the cockpit, tapering to zero reduction at the stern. I kept the modifications to the central peak of each form, and left the outermost 3-4" unchanged, so that the strips passing by the side of the cockpit would not be affected. In cross section, this resulted in a softening of the peak, although there is still a discernable centre ridge. This was planned in advance, at the time I was cutting out the forms. Its not something I’d like to try retroactively.

    2. I recessed my coaming, mainly following the methods in Nick Schade’s book, with a bit of winging it along the way. This does two things. It lowers the height of the coaming a little, but more importantly, it eliminates the pointy bit at both front and back of the cockpit, where the coaming transitions over the ridge.
I figure the combined effect of the above modifications was that the back edge of the coaming has been lowered by about 1 7/8”, compared to the design specs. Much friendlier for rolling, and for both self-rescues and assisted rescues following a capsize.

Be aware that the lower the coaming, the longer the cockpit opening has to be, in order to do a butt-first entry (ie. sit in the seat first, and then bring your legs in). Depends on your height, too, I suppose. I'm 6'5" and have to slide into my kayak feet-first.
(click to enlarge image)
yak cockpit-profile.jpg

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