bird mouth router bits

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Rabbit
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bird mouth router bits

Post by Rabbit » Wed Jul 19, 2017 9:01 am

hi all :)

been a while since i posted last.
every so often i get e-mail from a tool shop that specialises in wood working tools. usually i just glance and delete them as junk mail. this time something caught my attention. router bits specifically designed for bird mouth construction. not only that, but they also have a link to a video on using them!

the first posts on the forum, in the paddles, techniques, boat transportation, storage and maintenance section involved using a circular saw on a saw table to make the v. i used a 90deg router bit for my paddle shafts and seat frames strait over the top of the bit. didn't know there was such a thing as bit specifically for birds mouth, and also with different angles for different numbers of sides besides the standard 8.

for anyone interested the bits are made by a company called torquarta.

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Cruiser
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Re: bird mouth router bits

Post by Cruiser » Wed Jul 19, 2017 1:00 pm

I have aspirations of doing a few projects with birdmouth as well, these are the ones I got from Lee Valley


http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.a ... 9435,46174

I suspect there are a few more sources as well.


Brian

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Patricks Dad
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Re: bird mouth router bits

Post by Patricks Dad » Wed Jul 19, 2017 9:24 pm

I've always just used a table saw set at a 45 degree angle. The router bit approach might be a bit easier (although may take a bit more setup time).
Randy Pfeifer
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Randy.Pfeifer1@gmail.com

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Cruiser
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Re: bird mouth router bits

Post by Cruiser » Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:00 pm

I think the main advantage of the router bits, is they have different angles, allowing a different number of sides to the project, I think the ones have go from 6 to 18 sides.

There are a lot of other interesting projects and building techniques using these bits.

Brian

Rabbit
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Location: Downunder

Re: bird mouth router bits

Post by Rabbit » Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:29 am

Patricks Dad wrote:I've always just used a table saw set at a 45 degree angle. The router bit approach might be a bit easier (although may take a bit more setup time).
pd: when you use your method, you are stuck with 8 sides, and you always have that little bit of extra material sticking up past the level of the timber. for something that you are intending to make round, this is fine because you were always going to sand those down anyway. with these bits it allows you, up to a certain thickness of material, to set it up so that you get a flush fit. would have been useful for example when i made my seat frames, one of which was rounded, but the other was left octagonal. also would have been useful for the tea box i made from scrap left over from making the canoe. :tu

for those in north america the lee valley bits look to be the same as the ones i've seen.
the australian vendor for these bits, timbercon has a video on how to use them, that might make it clearer.

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Cruiser
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Re: bird mouth router bits

Post by Cruiser » Thu Jul 20, 2017 1:07 pm

I learned quite a bit from this guys videos ... alot of good info and ideas IMO.

http://www.davidhenrywoodarts.com/videos.html

Brian

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Patricks Dad
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Re: bird mouth router bits

Post by Patricks Dad » Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:30 pm

Rabbit, You're right. the table saw approach (in it's easiest form using a symmetric cut) does indeed leave extra wood to remove for a round result. The router bit approach gives more control. Nice.
Randy Pfeifer
(847) 341-0618
Randy.Pfeifer1@gmail.com

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