Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

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rmoffat
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Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by rmoffat » Sat Jul 23, 2016 1:18 pm

I just finished up varnishing the hull of my True North this morning, and anxious to turn her over and start on the deck. I know dry time for Epifanes varnish says 24 hrs, but should I give it more time so finish on hull doesn't get marked in the cradles? (5 coats applied - 24hrs between each coat) Searched online, but unable to find any useful info. Temp in my garage is 23C and humidity 72%

Thanks in advance.

Rob

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Cruiser
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Re: Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by Cruiser » Sat Jul 23, 2016 6:51 pm

I always leave mine a few days, the varnish is dry, but it isn't very hard ... I always worry about wrecking all that work, by putting a new carpet pattern into it.


Brian

rmoffat
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Re: Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by rmoffat » Sun Jul 24, 2016 8:46 am

Brian, thanks for your reply. At this stage of the build, the little kid in me, is anxious to see the true glossy shine of both the hull and deck at the same time, but the common sense adult in me, is telling me to wait :thinking I'm looking forward to the completion of my kayak, and hoping to start my "Ranger" build for my wife. She is working on her PhD, so I have lots of free time on my hands, but may run out of warm enough temps in the fall, as my garage is not heated. The True North Kayak was my first build, and strips were milled from 8,10,&12' lengths from 4x4's, and I have since sourced some 4/4 x 10 x 16' WRC planks, so I won't spend so much time scratching my head matching joints in the strips. So, this build should go much quicker, now that I know what I'm doing.

Thanks Again for your reply.

Rob

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Re: Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by Cruiser » Sun Jul 24, 2016 9:14 am

You cam always do a "nail test" on the varnish .... just pick a bit of an out-of-the -way place and press your finger nail into the varnish, if it doesn't leave a mark, you should be pretty safe to flip.


Brian

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Patricks Dad
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Re: Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by Patricks Dad » Mon Jul 25, 2016 10:51 am

I always leave the last coat to cure for at least a week before I flip it over and subject the new finish to any marring pressures.
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alick burt
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Re: Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by alick burt » Sun Aug 28, 2016 11:18 am

Hi Rob

I know you are not having drying problems as such but whilst talking to a friend of mine who is keen on restoring old wooden Canoes he mentioned that it helps to turn the boat over to dry the varnish on the inside because the solvents sink and collect making it take longer.
I haven't heard this before and have often noticed my varnish taking longer than I expect to dry on the inside so this might explain it for others too.

Cheers

Alick

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Jim Dodd
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Re: Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by Jim Dodd » Sun Aug 28, 2016 3:52 pm

I just finished varnishing the Outside of Nokomis, with Epifanes Gloss Wood finish.
I'll wait a week, maybe more.

Jim
Keep your paddle wet and your seat dry!

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Re: Dry Time for Epifanes varnish?

Post by Cruiser » Sun Aug 28, 2016 8:18 pm

Hi Alick,

To get around the issue solvent settling in the inside, I always leave a fan on low after I finish varnishing, I think keeping the air moving helps in general with the varnish setting up.

Now I also "tent" the canoe (actually the shop, I fasten sheets to the walls and ceiling) with plastic sheets to prevent any shop dust from ruining my day. I heard an interesting story about dust in the shop, apparently fluorescent lights are quite electrostatic when on and will help collect airborne dust. Of course when you turn them off ... the dust tends to drop .... something to consider, when leaving the shop for the night with the varnish setting.

I get away with the fan, largely due to the plastic tent I create for varnishing, but it is worth the effort IMO.

Brian

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